Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd World Congress on Medical Sociology & Community Health Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Medical Sociology 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Donna Vallone photo
Biography:

Donna M. Vallone, PhD, MPH serves as Chief Research Offi cer of the Schroeder Institute at Truth Initiative (formerly American Legacy Foundation) and holds adjunct appointments in the College for Global Public Health at New York University and the Health, Behavior and Society Department of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research interests focus on examining the infl uence of mass media to reduce tobacco use among lower socioeconomic status (SES) and racial/ ethnic minority groups. She is a section editor of the upcoming National Cancer Institute Tobacco Control Monograph, A Social Ecological Approach to Addressing Tobacco Related Health Disparities (expected 2017). Author of over 75 peer-reviewed academic manuscripts, Vallone’s research has been funded by various entities including the National Institute for Drug Abuse and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vallone holds a doctoral degree in Sociomedical Science, an interdisciplinary degree between sociology and public health, from Columbia University.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Significant changes in the media and tobacco use landscapes prompted changes in the message and media strategies for a new phase of the anti-tobacco truth campaign launched in 2014. A comprehensive media strategy was implemented across multiple platforms, and media messages were designed to focus on a broad smoking de-normalization strategy by showcasing various negative consequences of tobacco use, while enlisting this new generation to be part of a movement to end smoking. Five key attitudinal constructs were identifi ed, including anti-social smoking sentiment, antitobacco industry sentiment, independence, anti-smoking imagery, and support for an anti-tobacco social movement. The purpose of this comprehensive evaluation is to examine the relationships between awareness of truth campaign advertisements, the five key attitudinal constructs, intentions to smoke and tobacco use behavior using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample of youth and young adults. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Study samples for all analyses were drawn from the Truth Longitudinal Cohort (TLC), a probability-based, nationally representative cohort (n=14,000). Logistic regression models examine awareness of truth advertisements in relation to targeted attitudes over time. Structural equation models (SEM) tested causal pathways.
Findings: Regression results demonstrate a dose-response relationship between higher ad awareness and higher levels of antitobacco attitudes and intentions not to smoke, holding constant baseline attitudes and intentions. SEM models show higher ad awareness predicts higher anti-tobacco attitudes; attitude changes were signifi cantly associated with greater support for an anti-tobacco social movement; and in turn, greater movement support predicted lower levels of smoking intensity and a slower rate of progression over time.
Conclusion & Significance: A carefully designed, national anti-tobacco mass media campaign can help a new generation of youth and young adults reject tobacco. The evidence of increased tobacco use initiation among young adults calls for the continued support of public education mass media campaigns to inspire tobacco-free lives.

Keynote Forum

Frank Rasler

Dekalb Medical Centre, USA

Keynote: Health Behavior: Inspire yourself fi rst, Then the World
OMICS International Medical Sociology 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Frank Rasler photo
Biography:

Frank Rasler is an Atlanta emergency physician with 30 years of clinical care. He is experienced in behavior modifi cation and disease prevention, with training at Emory University and the C.D.C. in Atlanta. Motivating healthy behavior during a brief patient encounter has been a focus of his patient care.

Abstract:

Healthcare is overwhelmingly devoted to disease intervention rather than prevention, yet so much of what we treat is preventable. Healthcare professionals in all fields advise their communities on changing unhealthy behavior, yet often do not fully practice what they preach. If your own health habits are poor, or lack motivation to improve yourself, your ability and desire to inspire patients is minimized. For example, patients tend to ignore weight reduction information from an obese clinician. We need to inspire personal goals and find our unique enthusiasm for a healthy lifestyle. Changing behavior doesn't have to be diffi cult, it's just diffi cult to maintain. Negative visualization is an intense behavior modifi cation tool that can place you in an emergency room “near-death experience” to emphasize the reality of the risks we ignore, before it's too late.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 10:45-11:05 @ Piedmont Prefunction
  • Medical Sociology and Health Policies | Public Health | Epidemiology | Nursing | Mental Health
Location: Piedmont - 1
Speaker

Chair

Douglas A Feldman

State University of New York, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Frank Rasler

Dekalb Medical Centre, USA

Speaker
Biography:

Conner is a licensed clinical social worker and Assistant Professor of Mental Health Law and Policy at the University of South Florida. Her research investigates the factors that influence disparities in mental health service utilization and treatment outcomes for African American elders with depression. Dr. Conner is currently the primary-investigator of a study funded by NIMH (K23 MH09051-01) entitled “Enhancing Mental Health Treatment Engagement among Older Adults with Depression”. This study tests a novel dual component intervention designed to reduce stigma, provide elders in recovery an opportunity to give back to their community by serving as lay health workers (i.e. Peer Educators) to engage acutely depressed elders into treatment. Her peer reviewed work can be seen in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Journal of Mental Health and Aging, Journal of Aging Studies, Journal of Health and Social Policy, and The Journal of Gerontological Social Work.

Abstract:

Objective: Innovative strategies are needed to reduce the impact of stigma as a barrier to mental health services for older adults living with a mental illness, and to reduce un-necessary re-hospitalizations among older adults living with both physical illness and co-morbid mental illness. Th is study examined the impact of enhancing an already existing hospital re-admission reduction program (Care Transitions) with Peer support to better meet the needs of older adults being transitioned to back to the community from a recent hospitalization.
Methods: This study two-armed randomized controlled trial to compare the Care Transitions Intervention alone (CTI) with then enhancement of Peer Support (CTI+PS) on outcomes of interest including stigma, depression symptoms, and hospital readmissions in a sample of 25 racially/ethnically diverse older adults being released from our partner hospital aft er a recent admission for a medical illness, who also have a mental health diagnosis of depression.
Findings: Preliminary results suggest that adding peer supports to CTI enhances the ability of this transitional intervention to reduce hospital readmissions and to improve patient health outcomes. Participants assigned to the CTI+PS condition had signifi cantly lower 30-day re-admissions (10% vs 15%), and 60-day re-admissions (10% vs 20%), identifi ed signifi cantly less medication management challenges (via semi-structured interview), and were more likely to have completed an outpatient healthcare visit (85% compared to 75%) as compared to participants who received CTI alone.
Impact: This research suggests that adding peer support to the already evidence-based care transitions intervention significantly enhances its’ ability to yield positive outcomes in reduced hospital readmission; particularly among older African Americans. The results of this small study should be replicated in a fully-powered randomized controlled trial.
Funding: Funding for this study was provided by a University of South Florida Research Award (PI- Kyaien Conner)

Biography:

Eun Jung Im received her Bachelor of Arts in Classics major and Natural Sciences minor from University of Southern California. Eun Jung has been interacting with Korean-American families with members who have developmental disabilities while volunteering in Able Arts Inc. and as a special ministry teacher at Good Community Church of Torrance. Her recent research investigates the level of awareness of government services and benefits available to individuals with developmental disabilities and how it affects their family members

Abstract:

Korean-American families often face the issue of being unable to obtain the proper aid and the necessary support available for disabled family members due to various reasons, including language barrier and lack of knowledge of the family member’s disability. Without much information on the disabilities and the existing government-offered health services, Korean-American families, especially new immigrants, experience challenges in living with family members with disabilities. An anonymous survey was designed and distributed to families of Korean-American communities in California, New York, and Virginia in order to evaluate the extent of each family’s knowledge of available federal-, state-, and county-level assistances and their usage of these services for their disabled members. The survey seeks to put a particular focus on the possible relationship between individual family’s level of understanding of the government-provided assistance and their quality of life.

Biography:

Ikeyi Pauline Adachukwu is the Head of department and a principal lecturer in the department of Science laboratory Technology, Institute of Management and technology, Enugu, Nigeria. She specializes in medical biochemistry and biotechnology. She has put in over 20 years of teaching, research and administration in educational institutions in Nigeria. She has authored and co-authored books in biochemistry and biotechnology and has published widely in both local and international journals. Currently she has focused her researches and passion towards improving the health and wellbeing of her people.

Abstract:

Statement of problem: Food Taboos are foods and beverages, which are abstained from consuming for religious, cultural or hygienic reasons. These food taboos and habits however, have adverse impact on the health and socio-economic status of the Nigerian population especially the vulnerable groups- the women, pregnant women, children and the elderly. Food taboos have a long history especially in the developing countries like Nigeria. All communities in Nigeria practice a form of cultural (traditional) food taboo and Enugu State is no exception. Th is paper examined some food and nutritional taboos practiced in Nigeria and the medical and socio-economic impact.
Methodology: This study utilized random sampling and in depth interviews of 185 people between the ages of 20years and 70years. This is to ascertain the opinions of the population and to articulate their perspective of food taboo within their respective locality. In addition, to possibly determine the types of food avoided as taboos, the reasons and possible origin of the taboo, the most vulnerable and possible relationship between the practiced food taboo, medical and socio-economic status.
Findings: Study showed that these cultural practices are based mostly on learned or acquired behavior over years from parents, and/ or a conscious observation of the behavior of relatives and other close members of the community. Also they govern particular phases of the human life cycle and special events such as menstrual period, pregnancy, childbirth, lactation, and preparation for hunts, battles, weddings and funerals. Certain meats, meat parts and eggs are most avoided as taboo. Pregnant women and children are mostly involved in food taboos while the men are least involved.
Conclusion and significance: Pregnant women and children are mostly involved in food taboos. However, these populations appear ignorant and unconcerned on the medical and socio-economic impact.
Recommendation: Community education, campaign in schools and during antenatal/postnatal visits will go a long way towards effective fight against food taboos, improve the nutritional status and reduce malnutrition/micronutrient defi ciencies among Nigerians.

Table 1: Demography and socio-economic status of population under study.

Demographic factors and socio-economic status.

Number (N)

Percentage (%)

Age (years)

≤ 25

≤ 40

≤ 70

N= 185

65

75

45

 

35.1%

40.5%

24.3%

Sex

Male

Female

N= 185

90

95

 

48.6%

51.4%

Parity

Pregnant

Non-pregnant

N= 95

40

45

 

21.6%

24.3%

Ethnicity

Igbo

Others

N= 185

185

-

 

100%

Religion

Christianity

Others

N= 185

185

-

 

100%

Socio-economic status

Literate

Semi-literate

Illiterate

Uninformed

N= 185

55

40

50

40

 

29.7%

21.6%

27.0%

21.6%

 

Biography:

James Gillett is working as an Associate Professor in Health Aging and Society. James Gillett’s key areas of research include: human animal relationships; sport, leisure and recreation; mental health and well-being; media and communications; perspectives on living with health and illness across the life course; and inquiry as an approach to education and learning. His research is primarily qualitative and interpretative and is situated in social psychological and sociological theories and research perspectives. James’ work brings an important component to the Department of Health, Aging and Society, with its mandate to view aging and health as a social, political and historical process.

Abstract:

Background: Polypharmacy refers to the simultaneous use of five or more prescription medications. The risks of Polypharmacy include adverse drug reactions, falls/fractures, declines in physical functioning, financial burden, and increasing hospitalizing and mortality rates. To mitigate the risks of Polypharmacy, health care providers and patients are exploring the viability of discontinuing or tapering off medications that are not necessary.
Objective: The objective of this study is to better understand the perspectives of older adults toward Polypharmacy and deprescribing as a component of their on-going medical care. Insights drawn from the experiences of older adults who are going through the process of tapering are valuable in developing a set of best practices in this area both for patients and practitioners.
Methods: This qualitative study is situated within a larger project on deprescribing as a standard preventative care option for older adults. This larger study is a randomized controlled trial with a deprescribing program as the intervention, while the control group receives usual standard of care. In-depth qualitative interviews are conducted with both sets of participants about the meaning of their prescription medications in managing their health.
Findings: Preliminary data collection and analysis has identified three key themes. Firstly, medications are active social agents supporting and facilitating diverse social relationships. Secondly, medications present complex paradoxes that the individua negotiates, particularly the dilemma that medications are needed despite concern that they may cause harm. Lastly, diverse sources of lay knowledge underpin Polypharmacy and deprescribing, thus legitimizing alternative logic sources beyond the biomedical in understanding how people make sense of their medications.
Conclusion: On-going data collection and analysis seeks to further unpack these themes and identify additional emerging themes. This will ultimately contribute to the emerging scholarly literature on medication reduction by supporting the design and implementation of effective tapering programs for medical practice.

Speaker
Biography:

Mithun Gupta was a student of Masters of Public Health in NIPSOM, she has been involved with the research projects of social issues of health and also working in the Mayer hashi-II project as a Assistant programme offi cer. She is involved with research team of Mayer Hasi-II project funded by USAID too.

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: Oral health literacy is a new determinant of preventive dental behavior. Although OHL represents one's ability to understand and process relevant oral health information, other characteristics may modify one's behavior resulting decisions or actions. Psychosocial factors play an important role regarding this decision making of health behavior. Care givers are responsible for a wide range of issues including health promotion, and disease prevention for the children. Children requires more assistance with oral health behaviors, thus their oral health outcomes are more tightly linked to their care giver’s behaviors. Th is study was carried out to assess the Oral Health Literacy status and to evaluate the role of oral health literacy and psychosocial factors as a determinant of oral health among child caregivers.
Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in Mohammadpur Preparatory School and Mohammadpur model school of Dhaka city through face to face interview by using semi structured questionnaire among 370 respondents. Oral Health Behavior was measured by 15 additional question. OHL was measured by the Oral Health Literacy Adults Questionnaire (OHL-AQ) which was tested in a pilot study and showed to be reliable and valid (Naghibi Sistani et al., 2013). It contains 17 items in four sections Reading comprehension comprises 6 questions, Numeracy comprises 4 questions assessing ability, Listening comprises 2 questions
and Decision-making comprises 5 questions.
Findings: About 46.8% were in age group of 31-35 years, and 83.2% were housewife. Majority of the care giver 64.4% had adequate oral health literacy, 28.6% had marginal literacy about oral health and 7.0% of the care giver’s had inadequate literacy. Young aged care givers, those who have adequate oral health literacy and housewives in occupation were brushed their child teeth twice a day more than other care giver. High care giver’s activation measure knowledge and confi dence showed more dental visit by them and high CAM-skill showed more brushing frequency twice a day.
Conclusion & Significance: Care giver’s psychosocial factors influenced their oral health behavior despite of having adequate oral health literacy. Future studies should consider a range of these psychosocial factors that has not been studied more, but have shown to be important psychosocial determinants of health behaviors. Differential health education program on Oral Health Literacy for the caregivers through using BCC materials and methods could be organized.

Speaker
Biography:

Lurdes Rodrigues da Silva is a lecturer at Eduardo Mondlane University - Mozambique since 2001. She holds a bachelors honours degree in Linguistics and a master in Educational Management and leadership. She has a passion in improving the health and wellbeing of adolescents in Mozambique.

Abstract:

Mozambique’s adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) challenges are: early marriages, early pregnancies and HIV/ AIDS. In 1999 the Geração Biz Programme (GBP) was created to address these youths’ problems and improve their sexual and reproductive health (SRH). However, Mozambican youths continue to be exposed to risks related to their SRH. Academic literature recognizes that culture is the key in enhancing effective delivery of communication programmes. Concurrently, studies point to a lack of research analysing communication strategies of health campaigns. Given the country’s wide variety in terms of language and culture, this study explores whether the GBP communication strategies take into account the country’s complex cultural reality. This paper’s aims are: (i) To gain insight into GBP communication strategies; (ii) To identify cultural challenges to these strategies; and (iii) shed light on the implications of these challenges for GBP. The study uses the four input factors of McGuire’s Communication/Persuasion Model as its theoretical framework. Research methods included non-participant observation, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. Research questions were based on McGuire Communication/Persuasion Model, and data analysed thematically using Nvivo Pro11. The results of this study shows that while interpersonal methods are used to deliver preventive messages, sociocultural approaches are oft en ignored and not used to reduce cultural barriers; (ii) the cultural challenges to ASRH issues include initiation rites, sexuality and broader SRH issues, language and parents’ attitudes towards marriages; and (iii) these factors hinder effective delivery of program messages. Conclusions: The communication strategies used by GBP do not suffi ciently take into account the sociocultural context of Mozambique. Th e taboos around sexuality have silenced open communication in this regard. Ideas of sexual abstinence, condom use and campaigns against early marriages stand in opposition to certain (static) orientations of traditional initiations. Therefore, there is need for training of community and initiation rites masters with relevant SRH messages; bridging of the gap between initiation rites and GBP orientations; using sociocultural approaches and audience segmentation for cultural sensitive messages; and translating GBP handbook in the Makua language.

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Judite Mario Chipenembe Ngale is a lecturer at Eduardo Mondlane University - Mozambique since 2004. She holds a bachelors honours degree in Anthropology and Master Degree in Sociology. She is interest in researching the health and wellbeing of the sexual minority groups in Mozambique.

Abstract:

This paper explores the influence of the global public health strategies in the course of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people’s activism in Mozambique. It explores how, within the homophobic inconsistency in the implementation of the bill of rights, the health language reinforces “normative violence” that makes lesbian and bisexual women invisible in society. A Purposeful and snowballing samplings were applied to select 117 participants who introduced themselves as heterosexuals or LGBT in ten Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), 30 Semi-Structured Interview (SSI) and 16 in-depth interviews. Based on feminist post colonialism and inter sectionality, some categories and sources of oppression are identified in the narratives of lesbian and bisexual women participants such as compulsory marriage and corrective rape which, in turn, challenges the discriminatory notion of “key population most at risk to HIV/AIDS”. The study suggests that, the use of the global public health language by activists and stakeholders of civil society organization working in the field of sexual and reproductive health programs empowered them to speak more about protecting the “key population most at risk” to HIV/AIDS. Th is perspective leaves no space to visualise lesbian and bisexual women’s rights violation in the cities of Nampula and Maputo. Therefore, our findings suggest the need of an intersectional approach and action in the public health strategies in order to link gender to diversity and to take into account the “harmful cultural practices” that cover secret and discreet realities.

Speaker
Biography:

Ibama Asiton-a Solomon is a research Ph.D student of Public Health (Epidemiology and Disease Control Option) of Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria, using principles of Community Health, Epidemiology and Disease Control in researching, developing and implementing Public/Community Health Programmes/Interventions. He is a visiting lecturer on Use of Standing Orders and Research Methodology, Community Health Offi cers’ Training Programme, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. He is also an author of three text books and many other publications in journals of International repute and in Conferences. He is also a peer reviewer of International journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Gender had a much wider influence on disease than is usually acknowledged. More so, relative contributions of social and biological factors had not been clearly delineated for many diseases. Higher mortality rates are usually observed in male infants with lower acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and pneumonia particularly during the fi rst month of life than the female infants due to immature lungs in males. The rate declines between 6 and 12 months after birth. The study aims to determine the existence and pattern of relationship between risk of ARI and gender.
Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: The study was designed as a community based retrospective case-control study of 1,100 infants randomly selected from 12 communities out of 6 Local Government Areas of the 3 senatorial districts of Rivers State. A multistage random sampling technique was used in selecting the subjects up to the community level. Descriptive method was used to represent the characteristics of the subjects and the diff erences in ARI between males and female infants were tested in a bivariate logistics regression at 5% level of significance. Odds ratio (OR) were used to interpret the size eff ect measures of ARI on gender differences.
Findings: A total of 275 Cases of ARI and 825 controls were included in the study. Th e ARI cases were found to be slightly higher in infant females (27.8%) than in the infant males (22.4%). For the infants females, the odds for ARI were 1.3 times significantly higher compared to those of their males counterparts (OR = 1.32, p=0.048, 95%CI=1.003-1.735).
Conclusion and Significance: Understanding such differences between male and female infants will enhance the knowledge about the epidemiology, outcome and effectiveness in prevention and control of ARIs.
Recommendation: Awareness creation on gender differences in susceptibility to acute-respiratory infection among infants requires sustainable attention.

Speaker
Biography:

Sara Rosales Rivadeneira, holds the title of Lic. In Sociology and Political Sciences, she studied at the Central University of Ecuador. He later obtained a Master's Degree in Social Work Research and Social Planning at the same University. She began his professional practice as a Social Technician responsible for Social Development in international organizations such as World Mink International, CARE International, High Commissioner for the United Nations also in governmental organizations responsible for health and education programs. She is currently a Lecturer at the Technical University of Norte Ibarra Ecuador Faculty of Health, where she teaches and elaborates research work.

Abstract:

Because education plays a fundamental role, as a base of knowledge and allows the development of the skills that empower both men, women and adolescents in decision making and responsibility in health, it is important alternative sex education that offers the possibility of choosing patterns and behaviors, in accordance with their particular way of interpreting sexuality, harmonizing the individual, the social and enriching it without confl icting conflicts.
Study Objective: To establish the relation of educational level of the women residing in the Parish of Angochagua, of Ibarra Ecuador and its incidence in the Sexual and Reproductive Health. Materials and Methods correspond to non-experimental qualitative, observational, descriptive and cross- sectional, women aged between 15 and 61 years and older living in the study area were included,
who were previously informed consent was given a survey.
Results: A direct relationship between literacy and access to health care programs, a high number of pregnancies among single young women, a high number of children and children who died at an early age in women with lower levels of schooling were found Domestic violence, high mortality rate due to lack of access to health services, discrimination in health centers, exposure to postpartum illness, lack of rights, low self-esteem, low incomes, gender inequality, emigration, and illiteracy.
Conclusion: Young women with higher levels of education are aware of some sexual and reproductive health and although their condition regarding older and less educated women has improved, rural women are still discriminated against as a person and do not know about their universal right to health care.

Speaker
Biography:

Rocio Elizabeth Castillo Andrade obtains the Degree in Nursing at the Technical University of North Ibarra Ecuador, and of Magister in Teaching University and Educational Investigation, National University of Loja. She worked as a nurse in the Hospital San Vicente de Paúl de Ibarra. She is a professor in Nursing Career at the Technical University of the North. She has served as Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences of the Technical University of North. She currently serves as Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences of the Technical University of North.

Abstract:

The World Health Organization has been disseminating home delivery in order to reduce maternal-neonatal morbidity and mortality, with relevance in rural areas where more child births are attended with this characterization. The main objective was to characterize the traditional birth in the Cofán-Dureno nationality, Sucumbíos 2016. It is a qualitative and non-experimental study; Descriptive and cross-sectional study included women of childbearing age and caregivers resident in the Cofán community of Dureno Parish, who, prior informed consent, conducted a survey; the information obtained was tabulated in a database in Microsoft Excel. 78% have a free marital status, low education level, 8% illiteracy and 52% have completed primary education, 92% identified themselves as indigenous to Cofán Nationality. 76% of the births were domiciliary, this birth in 38% of the cases was chosen by custom, mostly using the vertical position, attended by midwives, with the presence of the spouses; the dress was a warm cloth coat, and allowed food and drink. It is customary to bury the placentas. Complications are minimal and irrelevant. With the qualitative part of the investigation it is concluded that the proper defi nitions on the home birth are the first option in this community guaranteeing the respect to the Cosmo vision.

Speaker
Biography:

Viviana Margarita Espinel Jara, obtained a bachelor's degree in Nursing from the Technical University of North, Ibarra Ecuador and a Master's Degree in Family Health at the Technical University of North, has worked as: Head Nurse at the Joya de las Sachas Health Center in Francisco of Orellana, and in the Provincial Directorate of Health of Napo where he fulfilled his functions as head of the Department of Intercultural Health, as well as a nurse of direct care in the Hospital of IESS Ibarra Ecuador. He is currently Professor of Nursing at the Technical University of North, member of the Editorial Board as Secretary of Drafting of the Scientific Journal of the Faculty of Health Sciences of the Universidad Técnica del Norte.

Abstract:

Introduction: Nursing has existed since time immemorial and nursing professionals have strived to achieve remarkable achievements, but this has not changed the image they are transmitted about them and the perception that the users have regarding the quality of delivery of the nursing services is of vital importance and great relevance.
Objective: To describe the social image of nursing professionals in Imbabura-Ecuador.
Materials and Methods: qualitative, non-experimental, observational and descriptive research, carried out in 300 external users of health units, of fi rst and second level of care, a survey was applied on the perception of nursing professionals.
Results: Predominantly female study group, whose highest concentration is between 20 and 64 years, self-defined as mestizos and indigenous people with a minority of Afrodescencients; more than 50% fi nished high school are engaged in trade, agriculture, domestic affairs and study. They accept nursing professionals of both genders, but in preference they always mention the feminine; They recognize to recognize these professionals by their uniform, to see them think to have a fast recovery; They feel respect, security and admiration for their kindness, sacrifice, vocation and professionalism; Recognize that they have studies of high academic level, own functions and suggest greater autonomy for decision making.
Conclusions: Men are not individualized as nurses; Nursing is the second option to choose among the health professions. The social image of the nursing professional is positive, socially accepted and highly valued.

Speaker
Biography:

Ximena Tapia Paguay Graduate in Nursing Technical University of North, Higher Diploma in Local Development and Health, Specialist in Management and Strategic Health Planning, Master in Health Management for Local Development Technical University of Loja, Higher Diploma in Curriculum by Competences Technical University of Ambato, Teacher Occasional Full Time, School of Nursing Polytechnic University of the State of Carchi (UPEC) 2007-2015, currently, Professor Titular Nursing Career Technical University of the North.

Abstract:

Intravenous accesses are one of the most frequent practices and a very important part of nursing work, and one of the problems that have caused many complications such as phlebitis and others. The methodology used in the design is quantitative not experimental, observational, descriptive and transversal. A survey was applied to nurses and an observation guide during the procedure , information is entered into a database in Excel, for tabulating the results are: 13 respondents professionals whose results show that there are optimal knowledge in biosafety standards, antisepsis , salinization of the path and care in handling the catheter, according to the results of the observation guide whose sample was 82 patients , it was found that there are rules that are not being met as leaving visible puncture site and labelling healing, while there is compliance with labelling of the path, shift circuits every 72 hours , fixing plasters clean and dry, solutions infusion change every 24 hours and with respect to the occurrence of phlebitis were identified 19 patients. It is concluded that there are contradictions between the results of the survey and observation guide because the nurses have knowledge regarding operation of the catheter but not fully applied in this patient.

Biography:

Sonia Revelo Villarreal with a bachelor's degree in Nursing at Technical University of North, obtained a Master's Degree in Public Health with a degree in Hospital Management and Research of health services at the Catholic University of Ecuador, she began her professional career in Management Carchi Health and Health Department of Sucumbíos as Program Coordinator of the MSP and part of the Epidemiology team and head of nurses, later provides her services in the Ministry of Public Health as Program and Project Coordinator, Director of Disabilities and currently Lecturer at the Technical University of the North.

Abstract:

In recent times there is great interest in the use of natural medicine, due to its effectiveness in some fields, nevertheless the potential risk due to excessive use or ignorance of the subject must be emphasized. In this way the execution of this research is relevant; the same that aims to identify the most frequent complications in childbirth due to ingestion of infusions of medicinal plants consumed. It is a qualitative, non - experimental, descriptive and cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 74 women who presented complications during labor and were attended in gynecology in the months of January - December, 2016. The obtained information was tabulated in Microsoft Excel database, obtaining the following results: the age of the women investigated oscillates between the 19 to 35 years, 32% have incomplete secondary education, 90% are authenticated as indigenous, 97% received The care of doctors and obstetricians and 3% went to the midwife, 73% of women presented complications in childbirth due to the infusion of medicinal plants, 22% by taking relaxing baths with plants, and a 5% Poultices were applied as ancestral customs. In conclusion, the consumption of medicinal plants, affects the labor of women and newborns according to testimony of midwives, these treatments alleviate birth and postpartum pain.